(507) 477-3235 9 Sixth Ave SE, Hayfield, MN 55940

Mrs. Talcott

Our Reading Series

Our Reading Series

First Grade Reading Strategies
good reader IS NOT someone who recognizes ALL of the words s/he encounters. A good reader IS someone who knows a variety of ways (strategies) to help figure out the unknown words. These eight strategies help to develop good readers, at any age:
  • Listen to how it sounds.
  • Look for key clues (words, pictures). 
  • Does it make sense?
  • Look for little words inside big words (chunks).
  • Look for similarities.
  • Try a popper (say the first sound of the unknown word and read on; maybe the word will “pop” into your head).
  • Backtrack and read it again.
  • Skip it and go on.
READING STRATEGIES FOR GOOD READERS
Below you will find some reading strategies that might be helpful to you as you try to help your children at home with their reading. These are strategies I use to help them ‘figure’ out words they do not know. Remember, becoming good readers takes lots of practice.
Look For Little Words In Big Words
Strategy: Look for ‘hidden’ words first to help you pronounce and identify the larger, unfamiliar words. For example, what is the little word in sit? (it)
Skip It And Go On
Strategy: If you run across a word you don’t know, continue reading the sentence. Sometimes the information that follows can help you identify the unfamiliar word.
Listen To How It Sounds
Strategy: Sounding out the letters can help you identify the word. Ask, “What are the beginning, middle, and ending sounds of the word? Guess the word and say it in the sentence. Does it sound right?
Look For Key Clues
Strategy: Look for key words in the sentence (nouns and descriptive words) or clues in the pictures that may help you identify an unfamiliar word.
Ask: Does It Make Sense?
Strategy: Think about what you’ve read so far and what you already know about the subject. What do you think the word might be? Does the word make sense in the sentence?
Search For Similarities
Strategy: Look and listen for similarities among words. Do they rhyme? Do they have the same letter patterns?
Try A Popper
Strategy: Sound out the first letter of an unfamiliar word and then continue reading the rest of the sentence. Many times the word will simply pop into your head.
Backtrack And Read Again
Strategy: If you run across a word you don’t know, go back and read the sentence again. You may notice clues you missed the first time.
Fitzpatrick, Jo. Reading Strategies that Work; Helping Young Readers Develop Independent Reading Skills. Ca: Creative Teaching Press, 1998

 

Components of our Reading Program:
  • Phonemic Awareness
  • Phonics instruction
  • Guided (small group) Reading
  • Independent/Self-Selected Reading (classroom and school library)
  • Story Time/Read Alouds
  • Author’s Corner/Shared Reading
  • Literature Units/Integrated Themes
  • Recreational Reading (Library, Scholastic Book Orders, Theme-related books)
  • Listening to reading
REMEMBER:
  • READING CAN TAKE YOU PLACES YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN OR MAY NEVER GET TO GO, SIMPLY BY USING YOUR IMAGINATION.
  • READING ALLOWS YOU TO BECOME SOMEONE YOU MAY NEVER GET TO BE, SIMPLY BY USING YOUR IMAGINATION.
  • READING INVOLVEMENT IS ONLY LIMITED BY YOUR IMAGINATION.