(507) 477-3235 9 Sixth Ave SE, Hayfield, MN 55940

Sally Conroy

Brownsdale Speech Clinician

Speech resources

Here are some of the signs to help you determine if your child has a speech, language, or hearing disorder.

Signs of a Language Disorder

  • Doesn’t smile or interact with others (birth–3 months)
  • Doesn’t babble (4–7 months)
  • Makes few sounds (7–12 months)
  • Does not use gestures (e.g., waving, pointing) (7–12 months)
  • Doesn’t understand what others say (7 months–2 years)
  • Says only a few words (12–18 months)
  • Doesn’t put words together to make sentences (1½–3 years)
  • Has trouble playing and talking with other children (2–3 years)
  • Has problems with early reading and writing skills—for example, may not show an interest in books or drawing (2½–3 years)

Ways to Help With Language Disorders

  • Listen and respond to your child
  • Talk, read, and play with your child
  • Communicate with your child in the language that you are most comfortable using
  • Know that it’s good to teach your child to speak a second language
  • Talk about what you are doing and what your child is doing
  • Use a lot of different words with your child
  • Use longer sentences as your child gets older
  • Have your child play with other children

Signs of a Speech Sound Disorder

  • Says pbmh, and w incorrectly in words (1–2 years)
  • Says kgftd, and n incorrectly in words (2–3 years)
  • Produces speech that is unclear, even to familiar people (2–3 years)

Ways to Help With Speech Sound Disorders

  • Say the sounds correctly when you talk—it’s okay if your child makes some mistakes with sounds
  • Don’t correct speech sounds—it’s more important to let your child keep talking

Signs of Stuttering (Disfluency)

  • Struggles to say sounds or words (2½–3 years)
  • Repeats first sounds of words—”b-b-b-ball” for “ball” (2½–3 years)
  • Pauses a lot while talking (2½–3 years)
  • Stretches sounds out—”f-f-f-f-farm” for “farm” (2½–3 years)

Ways to Help With Stuttering or Disfluency

  • Give your child time to talk
  • Do not interrupt or stop your child while he or she is speaking
  • See an SLP if you are concerned (Many young children stutter for a short period of time; in most cases, the stuttering will stop.)

Signs of a Voice Disorder

  • Uses a hoarse or breathy voice
  • Uses a nasal-sounding voice

Ways to Help With Voice Disorders

  • See a doctor if your child sounds hoarse or breathy or has a nasal-sounding voice
  • Tell your child not to shout or scream
  • Keep your child away from cigarette smoke

Audiologists help with hearing loss.

Signs of a Hearing Loss

  • Shows lack of attention to sounds (birth–1 year)
  • Doesn’t respond when you call his/her name (7 months–1 year)
  • Doesn’t follow simple directions (1–2 years)
  • Shows delays in speech and language development (birth–3 years)

Ways to Help With Hearing Loss

  • See an audiologist if your child did not pass the newborn hearing screening
  • Go to an audiologist if you have any concerns about your child’s hearing (some hearing losses can begin months or years after birth).
  • Ask your audiologist about the need for hearing aids or cochlear implants

This information is taken from www.asha.org